Guest Post

Chris Snider: Tidepool by Day, "Just Talking" Podcast by Night

Chris Snider: Tidepool by Day, "Just Talking" Podcast by Night

Tidepool is a powerful data collection and analysis tool. One that will change the way individuals with diabetes can integrate data and contribute that data to change the way we live with diabetes in the future. Exciting stuff. 

I found out about Tidepool from Chris Snider at the JDRF TypeOneNation Research Summit-- he was representing Tidepool while I speaking on balancing sports and T1D management. Not only is Chris the Community Manager for Tidepool, but he also has T1D himself and hosts a podcast: Just Talking. I even got the opportunity to sit down with Chris and talk about med school, The Marathon We Live, running the Boston Marathon, and cheering for the Washington Capitals.

Here, Chris shares Tidepool's mission, uses, and future directions.

Annalisa van den Bergh: What Cycling Really, Really Far Taught Us About Our Type 1 Diabetes

Annalisa van den Bergh: What Cycling Really, Really Far Taught Us About Our Type 1 Diabetes

Erik and I only did one true training ride before cycling across the country on Adventure Cycling’s TransAmerica Trail. Around this time a year ago, we hopped on the Metro-North with a few friends from our type 1 diabetes Meetup group and headed to Peekskill, New York...
 
...Both of our blood sugars kept dropping and it seemed no amount of granola bars and gummy bears would keep our numbers stable. 
 
We stopped. 
 
We ate. 
 
We stopped.
 
We ate.
 
We stopped.
 
We ate.
 
You get it.

Richard Vaughn: Reflections on 72 Years with Type 1 Diabetes

Richard Vaughn: Reflections on 72 Years with Type 1 Diabetes

There was no way of testing blood sugar at home, so we tested my urine instead. A special procedure involving a test tube with a solution containing drops of my urine was boiled on our stove. The solution changed color, and that gave some indication of how much sugar was in my urine. Each morning my urine was tested, and there was an injection of the animal insulin...

...In the mid 1980s I bought my first glucose meter. It had been 40 years before I was able to finally test my own blood sugar. I saw very high blood sugar almost every time I tested with the meter. Numbers in the 200s and low 300s were frequently seen, and there was no fast-acting insulin to correct those highs.

A1c tests were first available in 1976, and my doctor had my first A1c test done in 1980. It think it was a 12%. In 1988, I found a magazine article about carbohydrates, and I started reading labels on products. I began limiting the number of carbs I ate, and my meter started showing lower blood sugars. My A1c's improved. In the mid 1990s I started basal and bolus insulins. By the end of that decade my A1c's were in the high 5's and low 6's...

Aaron Johnson: You Can’t Always Get What You Want, But If You Try Sometimes….

Aaron Johnson: You Can’t Always Get What You Want, But If You Try Sometimes….

I never knew what I wanted to do with my life.  People told me all along the way that I’d figure it out.  In high school, in my undergraduate studies, and then again after I entered the “real world”.  I’ve spent my days surrounded by the inspired.  My brother is a political junky.  He’s always wanted to be involved in public policy and knew from an early age that’s what he wanted to do.  It drives him.  My wife is an ASL interpreter.  She found in her teen years she wanted to help the Deaf bridge the gap in communication.  She’s immersed herself in the community, she even interprets for people who are both deaf and blind.  She’s one of the top in her field.  I’m so very proud of these people.  They are successful, hard working, and driven.  If I’m honest with myself, I’m also extremely jealous of these people.  Not because of their success, or pay, or anything materialistic or tangible.  I’m jealous because they’ve found their “WHY”.

Erik Douds: Creating the Largest Travel Map for Diabetic Explorers

Erik Douds: Creating the Largest Travel Map for Diabetic Explorers

“Even if we are 1,000 miles away, I want people to feel at home.” These are the words by my close friend Geneva who joined a pact of explorers who prove that we can go anywhere in the world with type 1 diabetes. She answered a call for writers to form the travel blog Diabetes Abroad. I want to share with you why this travel blog started and how adding 1 photo can change our global community.